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Other Crimes Against Children

Are you facing charges for committing a crime against a minor in Ohio? Committing a crime against a minor is a serious criminal offense that carries serious, unforgiving penalties if convicted. Nearly every day in Ohio, there are a number of different crimes that happen against children. Charges for a crimes against minors are often the result of complicated and emotionally challenging situations, which is why it is crucial to consult with an experienced criminal attorney as soon as possible.

The following is a list of other crimes against minors in Ohio and the potential penalties that you may face if convicted.

Selling Alcohol to Minors

Selling alcohol to minors can be defined according to the Ohio Revised Code (ORC 4301.69) as anyone who does any of the following:

  • Sells, buys or provides alcohol to anyone who is underage unless it is for religious purposes, provided by a doctor for medical purposes, or the underage individual is supervised by a parent, legal guardian or spouse who is not underage;
  • Knowingly allows anyone underage to possess or consume alcohol on their property, unless it was provided under supervision to them by a parent, legal guardian, or spouse who is not underage;
  • Makes or uses reservations at a hotel, campground or restaurant when that person knows or has reason to know either:
  • That alcohol will be consumed by an underage person or people on the property, unless it is provided by a parent, legal guardian or spouse that is not underage;
  • That a drug will be used on the property, except if it was prescribed by a licensed health professional and it was in the original container.
  • Lets anyone who is underage make reservations at a hotel or campground or let another individual make reservations for them, if they know or have reason to believe that an underage person is drunk or is in possession of alcohol and is not under the supervision of a parent, legal guardian, or spouse who is not underage;
  • Lets anyone who is underage be subject to anything previously described, whether a parent, legal guardian or spouse who is not underage.

If you are convicted of selling alcohol to underage persons in Ohio, you will face a first degree misdemeanor. This entails at most six months in prison and $1,000 in fines.

Contributing to the delinquency of a child

Contributing to the delinquency of a child can be defined according to the Ohio Revised Code (ORC 2919.24) as behaving or acting in a way that resulted or could result in a child committing an offense.

If you are convicted of contributing to the delinquency of a child, you will be charged with a first-degree misdemeanor. This entails at most six months in prison and $1,000 in fines.

Nonsupport of a minor or dependents

Nonsupport of a minor is defined according to the Ohio Revised Code (ORC 2919.21) as anyone who engages in any of the actions listed below:

  • Abandons or neglects to provide sufficient support to their spouse, as mandated by the law;
  • Abandons or neglects to provide sufficient support to their child who is under 18, or to their mentally or physically disabled child who is under 21;
  • Abandons or neglects to provide sufficient support to their elderly, ill or adoptive parent who does not have the financial means or the capability of providing support for themselves;
  • Abandons or neglects to provide sufficient support to anyone that they are legally obligated to support;
  • Contributes toward their child depending on the state or neglected by not providing medical care, proper food, access to education and shelter.

If you are convicted of nonsupport of a child and the facts of your case indicate that you either abandoned or neglected to provide sufficient support for your spouse or child, then you will be charged with a first degree misdemeanor. This charge entails serving a maximum of up to six months in jail and paying up to $1,000 in fines.

If you have previously been convicted of nonsupport of a child, then you will be charged with a fifth-degree felony. This charge entails serving a minimum of six months and up to a year in jail and paying up to $2,500 in fines.

Interfering with custody of a child

Interfering with custody of a child is defined according to the Ohio Revised Code (ORC 2919.23) as anyone who engages in any actions listed below:

  • Attempts to or keeps someone under the age of 18 or a mentally or physically handicapped individual who is under 21 from seeing or having contact with their parent or guardian.
  • Attempts to or keeps someone who is bound by law to an institution for delinquent, unruly, neglected, abused children from not seeing or having contact with their parent or guardian.
  • Attempts to keep someone who is bound by law to an institution for the mentally ill or disabled from not seeing or having contact with their parent or guardian.
  • Aids or encourages a child to leave the custody of their parent or guardian, without legal consent.

If you are convicted of interfering with custody of a child, you will typically be charged with a first-degree misdemeanor. This charge entails serving a maximum of up to six months in jail and paying up to $1,000 in fines.

If you are convicted of interfering with custody of a child and the facts of your case indicate that the child involved in the offense is removed from the state, then you will be charged with a fifth-degree felony. This charge entails serving a minimum of six months and up to a year in jail and paying up to $2,500 in fines.

If you have previously been convicted of interfering with the custody of a child, you will be charged with a fifth-degree felony. This charge entails serving a minimum of six months and up to a year in jail and paying up to $2,500 in fines.

If you are convicted of interfering the custody of a child and the facts of your case indicate that the child involved in the offense suffered physical harm as a result, you will be charged with a fourth-degree felony. This charge entails serving a minimum of 6 months and up to a maximum of 18 months in jail and paying up to $5,000 in fines.

Disseminating matter harmful to minors

Disseminating matter harmful to minors is defined according to the Ohio Revised Code (ORC 2907.31) as anyone who recklessly engages in any of the actions listed below:

  • Shows, sells, delivers, disseminates, provides, exhibits, rents or presents destructive or obscene material to a minor;
  • Offers or agrees to show, sell, deliver, disseminate, provide, exhibit, or rent harmful or obscene material to a minor in any kind of way;
  • Intentionally allows a minor to view obscene or harmful material or a live performance while with the minor.

If you are convicted of disseminating matter harmful to minors, you will most likely be charged with a first-degree misdemeanor. This charge entails serving a maximum of up to six months in jail and paying up to $1,000 in fines.

If you are convicted of disseminating matter harmful to minors and the facts of your case indicate that the material or performance involved is obscene, you will be charged with a fifth-degree felony. This charge entails serving a minimum of six months and up to a year in jail and paying up to $2,500 in fines.

If you are convicted of disseminating matter harmful to minors and the facts of your case indicate that the material or performance involved is obscene and the juvenile involved is made the subject of the offense, you will be charged with a fourth-degree felony. This charge entails serving a minimum of 6 months and up to a maximum of 18 months in jail and paying up to $5,000 in fines.

Additional Consequences of Other Crimes Against Minors

Crimes against minors in Ohio involve harsh and unforgiving consequences in addition to extensive prison time and exorbitant fines and fees. Due to the serious nature of other crimes against minors, this charge could potentially be on your criminal background for the rest of your life.

A conviction for any of the other crimes against minors will negatively impact all other areas of your life. You may face having a reputation in your community as a dangerous and disturbed parent or guardian. You may also face difficulty keeping or finding a job, furthering your education, difficulty financially, obtaining loans, maintaining professional licensures and keeping custody of your children.

Every day in Ohio, there are many individuals who are charged with other crimes against minors. If you are facing other crimes against minors charges, it is imperative that you immediately contact the Cincinnati Criminal Defense Attorneys. Charges for other crimes against minors can be an overwhelming and anxiety-inducing experience, and you do not have to go through it alone. Although every case is different, it is crucial that you obtain an experienced, knowledgeable and compassionate attorney as soon as possible who will fight vigorously for your legal rights and best interest. The sooner you speak with an attorney, the better your options will be regarding your sentence. The Cincinnati Criminal Defense team has successfully defended hundreds of individuals charged with other crimes against minors. Their knowledge, experience, and compassion for your case will help you receive the justice you deserve.

Facing criminal charges? Contact us today.

Criminal charges can be an overwhelming and frightening experience. You are probably worried about your freedoms and privileges being at stake and have a lot of questions. You can rest assured, because the Cincinnati Criminal Defense team is here for you. Get the justice that you deserve. Don’t hesitate to contact us today at or email us at advice@cincinnaticriminalattorney.com.
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